kenobi-wan-obi:

Cosmic Majora’s Mask (The Devil’s Mask): NGC 6769 6770 6771

The Devil’s Mask are three interacting galaxies NGC 6769 6770 6771 which are some 160 Million Light Years away in the constellation Pavo. - Michael Sidonio

astronomicalwonders:

Dry Ice Pits on Mars
Part of Mars is defrosting. Around the South Pole of Mars, toward the end of every Martian summer, the warm weather causes a section of the vast carbon-dioxide ice cap to evaporate.Pits begin to appear and expand where the carbon dioxide dry ice sublimates directly into gas. These ice sheet pits may appear to be lined with gold, but the precise composition of the dust that highlights the pit walls actually remains unknown. The circular depressions toward the image center measure about 60 meters across. The HiRISE camera aboard the Mars-orbiting Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured the above image in late July. In the next few months, as Mars continues its journey around the Sun, colder seasons will prevail, and the thin air will turn chilly enough not only to stop the defrosting but once again freeze out more layers of solid carbon dioxide.

astronomicalwonders:

Dry Ice Pits on Mars

Part of Mars is defrosting. Around the South Pole of Mars, toward the end of every Martian summer, the warm weather causes a section of the vast carbon-dioxide ice cap to evaporate.Pits begin to appear and expand where the carbon dioxide dry ice sublimates directly into gas. These ice sheet pits may appear to be lined with gold, but the precise composition of the dust that highlights the pit walls actually remains unknown. The circular depressions toward the image center measure about 60 meters across. The HiRISE camera aboard the Mars-orbiting Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured the above image in late July. In the next few months, as Mars continues its journey around the Sun, colder seasons will prevail, and the thin air will turn chilly enough not only to stop the defrosting but once again freeze out more layers of solid carbon dioxide.

(via galaxyclusters)

thespacegoat:

IC 410: Emission Nebula

In the constellation Auriga, this nebula is about 12,000 light-years away and over 100 light-years wide. It is a cloud of glowing hydrogen gas, whose shape is sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from an embedded open star cluster called NGC 1893 [image via]

(via galaxyclusters)

christinetheastrophysicist:

First Hundred Thousand Years of Our Universe

To understand the mysteries of our universe, scientists are trying to go back as far they can to the Big Bang. A new analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation data by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has taken the furthest look back through time yet – 100 years to 300,000 years after the Big Bang – and provided tantalizing new hints of clues as to what might have happened.
Read More.

christinetheastrophysicist:

First Hundred Thousand Years of Our Universe

To understand the mysteries of our universe, scientists are trying to go back as far they can to the Big Bang. A new analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation data by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has taken the furthest look back through time yet – 100 years to 300,000 years after the Big Bang – and provided tantalizing new hints of clues as to what might have happened.

Read More.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

friarpark:

Different Views of the Carina Nebula

The Carina Nebula (also known as the Great Nebula in Carina, the Eta Carinae Nebula, NGC 3372, or Caldwell 92, as well as the Grand Nebula) is a large bright nebula that has within its boundaries several related open clusters of stars.

Eta Carinae and HD 93129A, two of the most massive and luminous stars in our Milky Way galaxy, are among them. The nebula lies at an estimated distance between 6,500 and 10,000 light years from Earth. It appears in the constellation of Carina, and is located in the Carina–Sagittarius Arm. The nebula contains multiple O-type stars.

The nebula is one of the largest diffuse nebulae in our skies. Although it is some four times as large and even brighter than the famous Orion Nebula, the Carina Nebula is much less well known, due to its location in the southern sky. It was discovered by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in 1751–52 from the Cape of Good Hope.

(via galaxyclusters)

heythereuniverse:

Comet-Like Knots Around a Dying Star in the Helix Nebula | HubbleSite
This colorful image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows the collision of two gases near a dying star. Astronomers have dubbed the tadpole-like objects in the upper right-hand corner “cometary knots” because their glowing heads and gossamer tails resemble comets. Although astronomers have seen gaseous knots through ground-based telescopes, they have never seen so many in a single nebula.
[Read more]

heythereuniverse:

Comet-Like Knots Around a Dying Star in the Helix Nebula | HubbleSite

This colorful image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows the collision of two gases near a dying star. Astronomers have dubbed the tadpole-like objects in the upper right-hand corner “cometary knots” because their glowing heads and gossamer tails resemble comets. Although astronomers have seen gaseous knots through ground-based telescopes, they have never seen so many in a single nebula.

[Read more]

(via galaxyclusters)

kenobi-wan-obi:


Rosette in Hubble Palette by Fred Herrmann

kenobi-wan-obi:

Rosette in Hubble Palette by Fred Herrmann

jtotheizzoe:

If you’re ever bored, might I suggest one of my favorite internet layovers: The Sun Now, daily updated views of our star from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory
It’s the only safe way to stare at the sun.
Curious about the colors? Check out this post. 

jtotheizzoe:

If you’re ever bored, might I suggest one of my favorite internet layovers: The Sun Now, daily updated views of our star from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory

It’s the only safe way to stare at the sun.

Curious about the colors? Check out this post. 

(via n-a-s-a)

mucholderthen:

GRAVITATIONAL WAVES  —  PATTERNS IN SPACE-TIME
A popular (and creative) form of scientific illustration
[Creative, because gravity waves may not actually exist — although the smart money (NSF) is betting that they do.]

Telescopes have been observing waves for a long time. The ones used by past astronomers were designed to make visible light waves more visible. Over time, people came to understand that there was more to the universe than what humans can register with their eyes, and started measuring radio, ultraviolet, and x-ray waves.

Most recently, scientists have turned their attention to measuring gravitational waves."Gravitational telescopes" let scientists observe fluctuations in spacetime itself

One way of picturing gravitational waves is to imagine the universe as a stretched-out piece of fabric. Planets and stars sitting on the fabric pull it out of shape, and anything placed close to them will fall towards them.

If heavier objects, like stars and black holes, remain still, then the fabric is still as well.  On the other hand, if things like neutron stars or black holes are romping around like happy, infinitely-massive puppies, the fabric will dip and ripple around them.

Those ripples in the universe are what scientists call gravitational waves.
__________________________________

TEXT based on How do we measure gravitational waves?

IMAGE CREDITS

  1. 3D visualization of gravitational waves produced by two orbiting black holes. CREDIT: Henze, NASA  (Via LIGO science)
  2. Simulation of two coalescing black holes. CREDIT: Werner Berger
  3. Computer model of the gravitational waves coming from the collision of two black holes. Image: MPI for Gravitational Physics/W.Benger-ZIB (Via science daily)
  4. Rappresentazione artistica di onde gravitazionali prodotte dall’esplosione di una supernova. CREDIT: Infn Photo (via Imagebank)
  5. An iron core collapses prior to explosion in a supernovaCREDIT: Ott, Dimmelmeier, Hawke, Schnetter, Kahler  [X] 

(via scientificillustration)

alxndrasplace:

(NASA/JPL/U of Arizona via Wired Science)  HiRISE has been monitoring steep slopes on Mars because some of them reveal active processes. In some cases, there are many seasonal flows on warm slopes, suggesting some role for water in their activity.
The central hills in Hale Crater is one such location, with thousands of seasonal flows on steep slopes below bedrock outcrops. The cutout shows a small sample of this image, with relatively dark and reddish lines extending onto sediment fans. These lines grow slowly over several months time, fade and disappear in the cold season (southern winter), then reform the next warm season (southern spring and summer).

alxndrasplace:

(NASA/JPL/U of Arizona via Wired Science)  HiRISE has been monitoring steep slopes on Mars because some of them reveal active processes. In some cases, there are many seasonal flows on warm slopes, suggesting some role for water in their activity.

The central hills in Hale Crater is one such location, with thousands of seasonal flows on steep slopes below bedrock outcrops. The cutout shows a small sample of this image, with relatively dark and reddish lines extending onto sediment fans. These lines grow slowly over several months time, fade and disappear in the cold season (southern winter), then reform the next warm season (southern spring and summer).

I'm April, Astronomy and Physics major. This is a blog all about the wonders of deep space. From celestial bodies to stellar parallaxes, all the way down to that CO2 core.